Sleep and CBD

Full-spectrum CBD (cannabidiol) is derived from the cannabis plant and contains various compounds, including cannabinoids, terpenes, and trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). While research on the specific effects of CBD on sleep is ongoing, some studies and anecdotal evidence suggest potential benefits for sleep, and full-spectrum CBD may offer additional advantages due to the entourage effect, where different cannabis compounds work together synergistically. Here are some potential benefits of full-spectrum CBD for sleep:

  1. Regulation of Sleep-Wake Cycles: CBD may interact with the endocannabinoid system, which plays a role in regulating sleep-wake cycles. It could potentially help individuals with sleep disorders like insomnia by promoting a more regular sleep pattern.
    • Reference: Babson, K. A., Sottile, J., & Morabito, D. (2017). Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Sleep: a Review of the Literature. Current Psychiatry Reports, 19(4), 23.
  2. Anxiety and Stress Reduction: Anxiety and stress are common culprits of sleep disturbances. Full-spectrum CBD may have anxiolytic (anxiety-reducing) effects, which could indirectly improve sleep by calming the mind.
    • Reference: Shannon, S., Lewis, N., Lee, H., & Hughes, S. (2019). Cannabidiol in Anxiety and Sleep: A Large Case Series. The Permanente Journal, 23, 18-041.
  1. Pain Relief: Full-spectrum CBD has anti-inflammatory properties that may alleviate chronic pain conditions. Improved pain management can lead to better sleep quality for individuals who suffer from pain-related sleep disturbances.
    • Reference: Russo, E. B. (2008). Cannabinoids in the Management of Difficult to Treat Pain. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, 4(1), 245–259.
  1. Relaxation and Sedation: Some terpenes found in full-spectrum CBD, such as myrcene, have sedative properties. These compounds, in combination with CBD, may promote relaxation and sedation, making it easier to fall asleep.
    • Reference: Russo, E. B. (2011). Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects. British Journal of Pharmacology, 163(7), 1344–1364.
  1. Reduced Nightmares: For individuals suffering from nightmares or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), full-spectrum CBD may help reduce the occurrence of distressing dreams.
    • Reference: Blessing, E. M., Steenkamp, M. M., Manzanares, J., & Marmar, C. R. (2015). Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Anxiety Disorders. Neurotherapeutics, 12(4), 825–836.

Remember – just because a company advertises ‘full-spectrum CBD’ does not mean that it’s what we are discussing here. It’s similar to the caution you need when buying eggs, and you see ‘cage-free’ or ‘free-range.’ Thanks to clever and deceptive marketing strategies, those phrases do not indicate that the chicken was allowed to roam on open pastures eating grass and bugs – that’s exclusive to ‘pasture-raised.’

The CBD market is far more unregulated than an established product like eggs, so it’s essentially the Wild Wild West, and it’s up to you to be informed and do your homework.

What authentic full-spectrum CBD indicates is a product that includes the full range of beneficial cannabinoids, terpenes, and other unique phytonutrients found in hemp. The best way to verify this claim is by looking at the company’s COA, and check to make sure a variety of cannabinoids and terpenes are present.

It’s important to note that while there’s promising research and anecdotal evidence, individual responses to CBD can vary.

It’s advisable to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement, including CBD, especially if you have underlying medical conditions or are taking other medications.

Always check for recent research and consult with a healthcare provider for personalized guidance.

Your Partner In Health,

Clarissa A. Kussin, ND, FMCHC, ERYT-500

How does Acupuncture work, and what can it treat?

Katie Depre LAc, LMBT, FABORM, NCCAOM

Though often described as traditional or ancient medicine, research has proven that Acupuncture has its place alongside modern medical practices. Hair-thin needles are placed in precise and therapeutic point locations along meridians. Meridians have been shown to mirror the fascial network of the body. Fascia surrounds all of the organs, muscles, bones, and nerve fibers. These points are located alongside nerve endings and blood vessels, thereby directly influencing blood flow and sensory nerves in the area (2,3). Functional brain imaging has shown changes in the brain when these points are needled (1). Since the brain controls the systems of the body (hormones, blood flow, stress responses, organ function, reproduction, etc.), influencing the brain and nervous system with Acupuncture will impact our health. Treatment encourages the body’s own systems of balance, commonly known as homeostasis.

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health outlines many of the researched treatable conditions (4); these include: pain management, osteoarthritis, sciatica, fibromyalgia, cancer pain, irritable bowel syndrome, asthma, depression, allergies, infertility, and menopause symptoms. Though more chronic conditions will require a series of treatment for complete resolution, I have personally witnessed immediate relief from insomnia, digestive complaints, anxiety, and pain in my clinic.  Especially because it is a non-pharmaceutical approach, many patients search out Acupuncture for treatment to acute and chronic conditions.

As a Fellow of the Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine Board of Reproductive Medicine, FABORM, I treat many patients with their fertility goals. By regulating the menses, we can prepare the body for pregnancy. Fertility work is best done weekly for three months prior to conception, as it takes three months for the egg to develop in the ovaries. During times of sympathetic stress (the flight or fight response), blood is shunted away from the ovaries and uterus. This can negatively impact egg quality and the thickness of the uterine lining.  By encouraging blood flow to these reproductive organs, switching the nervous system into a parasympathetic state (rest, digest, and repair), and regulating the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Ovarian Axis, we set the body up for success.

For patients undergoing IVF, the Paulus Protocol is utilized. This is a series of points done before and after an embryo transfer. “Clinical pregnancies were documented in 34 of 80 patients (42.5%) in the acupuncture group, whereas the pregnancy rate was only 26.3% (21 out of 80 patients) in the control group (5).”

Please reach out today if you have specific questions on how Acupuncture can help you realize your health goals!

Warmly,

Katie Depre LAc, LMBT, FABORM, NCCAOM

Sacred-sea.com

(919) 808-2638

  1. Huang W, Pach D, Napadow V, Park K, Long X, Neumann J, Maeda Y, Nierhaus T, Liang F, Witt CM. Characterizing acupuncture stimuli using brain imaging with FMRI–a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e32960. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0032960. Epub 2012 Apr 9. PMID: 22496739; PMCID: PMC3322129.
  2. Langevin HM, Yandow JA. Relationship of acupuncture points and meridians to connective tissue planes. Anat Rec. 2002 Dec 15;269(6):257-65. doi: 10.1002/ar.10185. PMID: 12467083.
  3. Bai Y, Wang J, Wu JP, Dai JX, Sha O, Tai Wai Yew D, Yuan L, Liang QN. Review of evidence suggesting that the fascia network could be the anatomical basis for acupoints and meridians in the human body. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2011;2011:260510. doi: 10.1155/2011/260510. Epub 2011 Apr 26. PMID: 21584283; PMCID: PMC3092510.
  4. Acupuncture: What You Need to Know. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. (2022, October). https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/acupuncture-what-you-need-to-know

What Exactly Is Applied Kinesiology?

Richard A. Laviano, DC, ND, FSBCT(c)



My doctor has recommended applied kinesiology to rebalance my vagus nerve.
Sounds like voodoo to me…. What exactly is applied kinesiology?

The importance of the vagus nerve for so many of our bodily function has been proven again and again in multiple medical studies. The vagus nerve runs from your brainstem down to your intestinal tract and is the ringmaster of your autonomic nervous system, all things “rest and digest”. When the vagus nerve is out of balance, it has the potential to create widespread dysfunction from intestinal motility (think small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) to quick “fight or flight” reactivity, anxiety, and even panic attacks.  A simple PubMed search of vagus nerve pops up34,789 results! We at CTW have come to rely on the finely tuned skills of practitioners expert in using modalities to rebalance the vagus. One of the most powerful, only in very experienced hands, is applied kinesiology (AK). Dr Rick Laviano of Falls Chiropractic and Injury in Raleigh explains below the role of AK.

Applied Kinesiology (AK) is a neurological rehabilitation therapy. At the International College of Applied Kinesiology in 2005 (1) Dr. Walter Schmitt eloquently presented a model that thoroughly explains it. He explains AK as an assessment and therapy that positively affects neurological function. We quote it here and explain it more simply below.

AK is a series of sensory receptor based diagnostic challenges followed by monitoring of manual muscle testing outcomes. All AK techniques are about creating sensory receptor stimulation that results in a net effect of excitation and inhibition leading to more optimal neurological function. These positive changes can be observed through somatic windows by changes toward normal in muscle facilitation and inhibition(muscle balance, range of motion, deep tendon reflexes) and through various autonomic windows that can also be monitored (pupil light response, blood pressure, heart rate, etc.) (pg. 1)

AK uses muscle tests as well as other neurological tests to assess the state of your nervous system. When there is poor neurological function discovered, the doctor tries his or her best to find the neurological therapy that will improve it. For example, the brainstem (area of the brain just above your neck), controls most of the things in your abdominal cavity subconsciously like your heartrate, blood pressure, gut motility, gut valves, and liver detox. We can see how healthy the brainstem is by looking at reflexes that live there, like how fast your pupils react to a shining light, or how your jaw moves, or how your balance is, or how your blood pressure compares from one side to another (2,4).

A physician trained in AK will use these nerdy tools to pinpoint what part of the nervous system may be dormant or over-excited. Then they will wake it up or calm it down through a targeted therapy such as rubbing, tapping, stretching, manipulation, eye movements, muscle/fascial work etc. AK specialists can be considered your body electricians! The ultimate goal is to improve function in the nervous system to thus improve total body health and wellness.

Since the nervous system controls every function in our bodies, there have been many types of cases Applied Kinesiologists have seen over the years. Cases that are often seen include gut/microbiome issues. It is important that these patients understand that the gut microbiome is STRONGLY influenced by the state of their gut nervous system. Improving the integrity of the nervous system in these patients can greatly improve their quality of life.

Another point worth mentioning regarding gut issues includes the trigeminal nerves. The largest cranial nerve in our brain is the trigeminal nerve. This nerve coordinates information regarding the teeth, jaw, head, and even your posture (3)!This nerve integrates (strongly connects) with the vestibular, ocular, and cerebellar reflexes that affect the health of the brainstem, even the health of the vagus nerve. By keeping the trigeminal nerve and its connections in the brainstem healthy, vagal tone is optimal! In treating gut problems, the priority is making sure that trigeminal, head, eyes, and balance organs are in tune with one another for the health of the autonomic nervous system including the vagus nerve and ultimately the gut.


References:
1.      Schmitt, Walter H., The Neurological Rationale for a Comprehensive Clinical Protocol Using Applied Kinesiology Techniques. Proceedings of the I.C.A.K. – U.S.A. Annual Meeting, Volume 1,2005-2006. p. 157-191.
2.      Monaco, A., Cattaneo, R., Mesin, L., Ciarrocchi,I., Sgolastra, F., & Pietropaoli, D. (2012). Dysregulation of the autonomous nervous system in patients with temporomandibular disorder: a pupillometric study.
3.      Cuccia, A., & Caradonna, C. (2009). The relationship between the stomatognathic system and body posture. Clinics, 64(1),61-66.
4.      Applied Kinesiology Synopsis: David S. Walther. 1988.


Your Partners In Health,
Richard A. Laviano, DC, ND, FSBCT(c) and Ana Dávila, DC Falls Chiropractic and Injury, Raleigh NC

Frances T Meredith, MD Carolina Total Wellness